Month: October, 2011

8. MEĐUNARODNI SAJAM EKOLOGIJE ECOFAIR BEOGRAD 12.-14.10.2011.

USPEŠNOST PREZENTACIJE UDRUŽENJA NA SAJMU BILA JE KRUNISANA POSETOM MINISTRA EKOLOGIJE, RUDARSTVA I  PROSTORNOG PLANIRANJA ; G-DINA OLIVERA DULIĆA. TOM PRILIKOM UPOZNALI SMO MINISTRA SA NAŠIM RADOM I UKRATKIM CRTAMA MU PREDOČILI DALJE PUTEVE SARADNJE, KAO I OBLIKE PODRŠKE KOJE OČEKUJEMO U NAREDNOM PERIODU. 

 ČLANOVI BIOGENA SU POSETIOCIMA PREDOČILI PROGRAM RADA I PREZENTOVALI MATERIJAL KOJI SU  SVOJIM SAMOPREGORNIM RADOM I ANGAŽOVANJEM, U PROTEKLIH GODINU DANA, USPELI DA SAKUPE  NA MEĐUNARODNIM KONFERENCIJAMA U VEZI UTICAJA NEJONIZUJUĆEG ZRAČENJA NA ZDRAVLJE  LJUDI (prvenstveno dece) I ŽIVOTNU SREDINU. 

 JASAN POKAZATELJ I POTVRDA OSNIVANJU UDRUŽENJA JESTE ODJEK POSTOJANJA KOJI SMO IMALI KOD  MEĐUNARODNIH ORGANIZACIJA KAO ŠTO SU  : ICNIRP- Međunarodna komisija za nejonizujuće zračenje i  zaštitu, BfS – Nemačka savezna kancelarija za zaštitu od nejonizujućeg zračenja, INIS – Slovenački Institut za  Nejonizujuće zračenje i mnogi drugi. OVOM AFIRMACIJOM PREUZELI SMO NA SEBE VELIKU Read more →

Children and Adolescent Mobile Phone Users at No Greater Risk of Brain Cancer Than Non-users

 

Children and adolescents who use mobile phones are not at a statistically significant increased risk of brain cancer compared to
their peers who do not use mobile phones, according to a study published July 27 in the Journal of The National Cancer Institute.
Mobile phone usage has increased among children and adolescents in recent years. The increased usage has raised a concern
about the possibility of the development of brain tumors in this population since children have a developing nervous system;
also, because their head circumference is smaller, the radio frequency electromagnetic fields may penetrate regions that are
deeper in their brains. However, no previous study has examined whether mobile phone usage among children and adolescents
is associated with a difference in brain tumor risk.
To determine the relationship between mobile phone usage and brain tumor risk among children and adolescents,
Martin Röösli, Ph.D, of the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues looked at
the medical records of children aged 7–19 with brain tumors, identified through population registries. Researchers did
face-to-face interviews with them regarding their mobile phone usage. They also consulted data from phone network
providers.
The study, conducted between 2004 and 2008, included participants from Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland. They
looked at data for 352 brain cancer patients, and 646 control subjects.
The researchers found that patients with brain tumors were not statistically significantly more likely to have been regular
mobile phone users than control subjects. They found that 265 (75.3%) of case patients and 466 control subjects (72.1%)
reported having spoken on a mobile phone more than 20 times before the time when the case patient was diagnosed.
Furthermore, 194 case patients (55%) and 329 control subjects (51%) reported regular mobile phone usage. However, in a
subset of study participants for whom operator recorded data were available, brain tumor risk was related to the time elapsed
since the mobile phone subscription was started (but not to amount of use). No increased risk of brain tumors was observed for
brain areas receiving the highest amount of exposure.
The researchers write, “Because we did not find a clear exposure-response relationship in most of these analyses, the available
evidence does not support a causal association between the use of mobile phones and brain tumors.” Nevertheless, since mobile
phone usage among children and adolescents has increased over the years, they encourage a careful watch on the trend.
In an accompanying editorial, John D Boice, Jr., ScD. and Robert E. Tarone, Ph.D., of the International Epidemiology Institute
in Rockville, Maryland and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee write that Röösli and his colleagues “have filled an
important gap in knowledge by showing no increased risk of brain tumors among children and adolescents who are regular cell
phone users.”
Boice and Tarone conclude that it is reassuring that the incidence rates of brain cancer in the general population, including
children and teenagers, have not changed over the past 20 years in the United States and many other countries despite the
steady and marked rise in the use of cell phones throughout the world since the 1980s. They recommend that investigators
continue to monitor population incidence rates and that in the meantime, individuals who are concerned might consider
alternatives to holding a cell phone up to their ears, such as using an ear piece or using the phone’s speaker. They also point out

Children and adolescents who use mobile phones are not at a statistically significant increased risk of brain cancer compared totheir peers who do not use mobile phones, according to a study published July 27 in the Journal of The National Cancer Institute.Mobile phone usage has increased among children and adolescents in recent years. The increased usage has raised a concernabout the possibility of the development of brain tumors in this population since children have a developing nervous system;also, because their head circumference is smaller, the radio frequency electromagnetic fields may penetrate regions that aredeeper in their brains. However, no previous study has examined whether mobile phone usage among children and adolescentsis associated with a difference in brain tumor risk.To determine the relationship between mobile phone usage and brain tumor risk among children and adolescents,Martin Röösli, Ph.D, of the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, Switzerland, and colleagues looked atthe medical records of children aged 7–19 with brain tumors, identified through population registries. Researchers didface-to-face interviews with them regarding their mobile phone usage. They also consulted data from phone networkproviders.The study, conducted between 2004 and 2008, included participants from Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Switzerland. Theylooked at data for 352 brain cancer patients, and 646 control subjects.The researchers found that patients with brain tumors were not statistically significantly more likely to have been regularmobile phone users than control subjects. They found that 265 (75.3%) of case patients and 466 control subjects (72.1%)reported having spoken on a mobile phone more than 20 times before the time when the case patient was diagnosed.Furthermore, 194 case patients (55%) and 329 control subjects (51%) reported regular mobile phone usage. However, in asubset of study participants for whom operator recorded data were available, brain tumor risk was related to the time elapsedsince the mobile phone subscription was started (but not to amount of use). No increased risk of brain tumors was observed forbrain areas receiving the highest amount of exposure.The researchers write, “Because we did not find a clear exposure-response relationship in most of these analyses, the availableevidence does not support a causal association between the use of mobile phones and brain tumors.” Nevertheless, since mobilephone usage among children and adolescents has increased over the years, they encourage a careful watch on the trend.In an accompanying editorial, John D Boice, Jr., ScD. and Robert E. Tarone, Ph.D., of the International Epidemiology Institutein Rockville, Maryland and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee write that Röösli and his colleagues “have filled animportant gap in knowledge by showing no increased risk of brain tumors among children and adolescents who are regular cellphone users.”Boice and Tarone conclude that it is reassuring that the incidence rates of brain cancer in the general population, includingchildren and teenagers, have not changed over the past 20 years in the United States and many other countries despite thesteady and marked rise in the use of cell phones throughout the world since the 1980s. They recommend that investigatorscontinue to monitor population incidence rates and that in the meantime, individuals who are concerned might consideralternatives to holding a cell phone up to their ears, such as using an ear piece or using the phone’s speaker. They also point outthat individuals should heed what is known about real risks by avoiding the use of cell phones while driving a car, because such distractions have been clearly documented to increase the risk of accidents and injuries.

This is from: “Journal of the National CancerJ Institute NCI”25.10.2011.g

Downloaded from http://jnci.oxfordjournals.org/

 

Резултати истраживања CEFALO студије о односу између употребе мобилних телефона и рака код младих



CEFALO је међународно истраживање путем анкета  спроведених у неколико центара и то у Данској, Шведској, Норвешкој  и Швајцарској. Кроз ову  студију која истражује  везу између  употребе  мобилних телефона  међу младим  људима  узраста од 7 до  19 година  и појаве тумора мозга, траже се коначни одговори науке пред хипотетичким питањем шире светске јавности о могућим последицама штетности по здравље од нејонизујућег зрачења емитованог са мобилних Read more →

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